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angeles police office wanted for murder. >> suarez: we turn to iran as the u.s. tightens sanctions but tehran shows no signs of halting its nuclear program or engaging in talks. >> brown: from our american graduate series, we have the story of a chicago non-profit that aims to change the lives of would-be dropouts. >> what's interesting about one goal is that it pinpoints and targets low-income, underperforming students in non- selective chicago public schools, students who are least likely to graduate from high school, let alone college. >> suarez: we look at newly released documents showing leaders in the catholic church in los angeles shielded pedophile priests and failed to report allegations of child abuse. >> brown: and gwen ifill talks with biographer jeanne theo- haris, who offers a complex portrait of the woman best known for refusing to give up her seat on an alabama bus in 1955. >> she is celebrated for one act and i think part of that celebration puts it all in the past, right, when the actual rosa parks keeps working on racial and social justice issues all the way up t
a marriage of sorts, on this valentine's day. their combination means the field of major u.s. carriers will shrink by one. these jetliners-- sporting shiny new paint jobs-- are among the roughly 900 planes in the american airlines fleet and they're about to be joined by the 622 planes currently flying for u.s. airways. the price tag for the deal: $11 billion. creditors of american's bankrupt parent company a.m.r. will own 72% of the combined airline. the merger affects some 187 million passengers who fly the two airlines annually. >> i grew up on u.s. airways. >> brown: as well as more than 100,000 employees. >> our best goal going forward is to make it the biggest, strongest airline in the country, and i suppose that's about to happen. >> brown: the combined company will keep the american name and headquarters in fort worth, texas. but it is u.s. airways c.e.o. doug parker who will run it. his counterpart-- tom horton at american-- will serve as chairman, but bow out after the transition the two are friends who started their careers together at american three decades ago. >> to run a
place. back then, the u.s. was in the catbird seat, poised to lead the world down this astonishing new superhighway of information and innovation. now many other countries offer their citizens faster and cheaper access than we do. the faster high-speed access comes through fiber optic lines that transmit data in bursts of laser light, but many of us are still hooked up to broadband connections that squeeze digital information through copper wire. we're stuck with this old-fashioned technology because, as susan crawford explains, our government has allowed a few giant conglomerates to rig the rules, raise prices, and stifle competition. just like standard oil in the first gilded age a century ago. in those days, it was muckrakers like ida tarbell and lincoln steffens rattling the cages and calling for fair play. today it's independent thinkers like susan crawford. the big telecom industry wishes she would go away, but she's got a lot of people on her side. in fact, if you go to the white house citizen's petition site, you'll see how fans of "captive audience" are calling on the presiden
was patiently waiting while i introduced the guests at the table. can you tell us what the u.s. government doing is in this general area? >> perhaps a lot of people will remember that choicepoint had a type of breach and lexisnexis also did as well as lots of people. >> tell us about --. >> i could list the number of people but the bottom line is these breaches mean that people's personal identifiable information is made public and thieves could use it for predatory purposes. one thing that was not mentioned in the discussion i heard you folks talk about was credit cards. a lot of these credit cards are being -- the information is being sold to someone, he uses it for his own benefit, he or she, and lots of times it could be used for nef fairous purposes which goes to some of the concerns we have with the war on terrorism, a lot of people could take credit cards and use it to buy things -- before you stop it. now, near congress, we have a bill that passed out of my subcommittee called -- it's h.r. 4127, it's called the data accountability and trust act. i don't think most americans realize this
for us. what does that mean? >> i think the good news here is that the u.s. economy is actually growing at probably about a 2% rate. so if the full sequester goes in and stays in place for the full year between now and the end of the year, then it's essentially what mr. bernanke is saying growth will be 1.5% instead of 2%. i doubt very much that's the way it's going to pan ot. entllysome kind of compromise will be worked out. but again the good news is that the u.s. consumers, u.s. businesses, are beginning to spend, are beginning to hire in the case of businesses, and that momentum seems to actually be picking up a little bit. so even in the worst case scenario we're not talking a recession. we're talking slower growth which isn't good... >> ifill: not good at a time when you're recovering. so when people look at this debate that's going on now, how do we look at it? do we look at it long-term, short term? o we look at the reality or the possibility? what is the greatest, most damaging part of this? >> well, i think the damaging part of it is, you know, this is a very, very bad way to
on the monster storm from bernie rayno of accuweather. >> woodruff: then, should the u.s. arm the rebels in syria? ray suarez examines a growing rift between the white house and key members of the president's cabinet. >> brown: spencer michels has the story of new discoveries about mars coming from the rover vehicle known as "curiosity," the product of nasa's jet propulsion lab. >> it may sound familiar but what scientists here at jpl are actually looking for are signof lfeast and present on the red planet >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with pulitzer- prize-winning humorist dave barry about miami, the "insane city" that's the focus of his new novel. >> the people come from everywhere, people just weird people are attracted to miami. the wildlife is weird, the weather is weird, it's a festering stew of weirdness. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created
it means for the u.s. military. i'm joined by deputy secretary of defense ashton carter. welcome, mr. secretary s let justick up wth tat coent from some republicans that this is exaggerated. >> well, for us in the defense department, unfortunately, it's not exaggerated. in fact, we don't want to take any of these steps. we certainly are trying to do it in the way that does the minimum damage to national security. we don't have a lot of flexibility, and we don't have a lot of time in that regard. sequester requires us to find $46 billion in the last half of the year, and then we have an additional problem with the lack of an appropriations bill, which is a particular problem for us. you put those two things togher, and in some of accounts that fund training, for example, for army units, those accounts are 30% short over the year, and now we only have half the year in which to make up those savings. what that means is we're ging to protect the wars in afghanistan-- we've got to nund them. we have to fund-- need to fund military personnel. the president exempted military personnel from
these circumstances. aise said, in some cases, that's notoingo be possible. >> woodruff: i is u.s. national security at stake because of what might happen? >> it is, in the following sense-- by the end of the year, as i said, two-third of our army units, active-duty army units and all of our reserve units will not be ready to fight other wars. many of our air force air units will not be ready to fight other wars. a third of our ships in the pacific will not be at sea. it's not becau they-- they're not there. the ips aren't there. it's because we can't afford to operate them because we don't have any money left in the accounts that fund them. and we have to cut account by account by account. that's what sequestration forces us to do. >> woodruff: if this gets resolved secretary carter between now and march 1, or soon thereafter, are will all these cuts go away. >> oh, yes, we would never do any of these things. it's everyone's hope that deals that cover revenues and expenditures which everybody knows is necessary that that deal can be made, if congress can come around with a deal like that that the p
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)